Peter Farrelly’s ‘Green Book’ a sweet story of friendship against backdrop of mid-century American racism (Movie review)

Writer-director Peter Farrelly smooths out the excesses of his filmmaking traits for the surprisingly mainstream and easy-to-like “Green Book” (2018), now back in theaters and also available for home viewing. It’s not as funny as his best films like “Dumb and Dumber” and not as high-concept as the likes of “Stuck on You” and “Shallow Hal.” It’s possibly a crass grab at mainstream and critical acceptance, but it’s hard to quibble with the finished product.

Continue reading “Peter Farrelly’s ‘Green Book’ a sweet story of friendship against backdrop of mid-century American racism (Movie review)”

‘First Man’ is one small step for space-program cinema, one giant leap for insight into Neil Armstrong (Movie review)

After his love letters to jazz — “Whiplash” (2014) and “La La Land” (2016) — a film fan wouldn’t be surprised if director Damien Chazelle’s next movie was about Louis Armstrong. But “First Man” (2018) instead chronicles Neil Armstrong, and while it might seem like the pantheon of historical space-program cinema doesn’t need another recounting of Apollo 11, it turns out this is a very welcome addition.

Continue reading “‘First Man’ is one small step for space-program cinema, one giant leap for insight into Neil Armstrong (Movie review)”

First episode impressions: ‘I Am the Night’ (TV review)

TNT found a nice way to ride the success of a series without forcing it beyond the natural end of its storyline. “The Alienist” – my No. 4 show of 2018 — became a critical and popular success a year ago, but it told a complete serial-murder mystery. That series is over, but TNT is continuing its Suspense Collection with “I Am the Night” (9 p.m. Eastern Mondays).

Continue reading “First episode impressions: ‘I Am the Night’ (TV review)”

John’s top 10 movies of 2018

The dominant genre of 2018 continued to be superheroes; even with the “X-Men” Universe and DC Extended Universe releasing only one film each, the three Marvel Cinematic Universe movies were impossible to overlook. Still, this was a less blockbustery year than 2017, and by year’s end I had seen at least one really good film in every genre. From a throwback thriller to an arthouse gem, here are my 10 favorite films of 2018.

Continue reading “John’s top 10 movies of 2018”

Lee achieves a nice mix of humor and harrowing history in ‘BlacKkKlansman’ (Movie review)

“BlacKkKlansman” continues the trend of films based on true stories – along with the likes of “I, Tonya” and “The Disaster Artist” – that would be labeled as illogically plotted if they were fictional. This Spike Lee joint is the story of Ron Stallworth, not the Steelers player but rather a Colorado Springs detective who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan as an undercover detective in the 1970s, despite being black.

Continue reading “Lee achieves a nice mix of humor and harrowing history in ‘BlacKkKlansman’ (Movie review)”

‘Adrift’ floats between romance and survival, doesn’t do either one particularly well (Movie review)

“Adrift” is the true story of Tami Oldham (Shailene Woodley) and Richard Sharp (Sam Claflin), who accept an offer from a wealthy couple to sail their boat from Tahiti to California. Along the way they encounter one of the most catastrophic hurricanes in history, causing their boat to be wrecked and stranded at sea. As the film unfolds through a series of flashbacks, we live through the buildup of their relationship as well as the disaster itself.

Continue reading “‘Adrift’ floats between romance and survival, doesn’t do either one particularly well (Movie review)”

Suspense is missing from ‘Making a Murderer’ Season 2 (TV review)

Season 1 of the documentary “Making a Murderer” was a cultural phenomenon when it premiered in December 2015. Everyone was talking about it, so it was something I had to watch. The series is very one-sided, siding with the accused, claiming he is innocent, and the show-makers do an incredible job of convincing the viewer. The show itself is really addictive as each of the 10 episodes is presented in a way that there are cliffhangers – a certain piece of evidence found or a break in the case, for example.

Continue reading “Suspense is missing from ‘Making a Murderer’ Season 2 (TV review)”

‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ a slow but rewarding character study (Movie review)

Director and co-writer Gus Van Sant channels some of the character- and relationship-building magic of “Good Will Hunting” in “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” which delivers a message that a good life can grow out of horrible circumstances if one works at it. Yet this film – which is still playing in some arthouse theaters — is never preachy.

Continue reading “‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ a slow but rewarding character study (Movie review)”

Yes, I am serious: LaBeouf shines as ‘Borg vs McEnroe’ pulls viewers into minds of tennis greats (Movie review)

If there’s an award for set design successfully mimicking reality, “Borg vs McEnroe” – now available on home video – should win it. I’ve seen the 1980 Wimbledon final on DVD, so I couldn’t help but watch the film’s final act with a technical eye. The art department obviously pored over the footage to re-create the details: the white tennis balls (even though they don’t show up well on screen), the wheelchair seats being practically on the court, the way the players’ chairs are at 90-degree angles to one another. Unfortunately, the film didn’t get a Coke sponsorship, so we miss out on the now-bizarre fact that players drank soda on changeovers.

Continue reading “Yes, I am serious: LaBeouf shines as ‘Borg vs McEnroe’ pulls viewers into minds of tennis greats (Movie review)”

‘The Post’ fondly recalls the old days of a respected press, war protests (Movie review)

One of my bosses encouraged us to attend “The Post” (2017) – which recently got a wide theatrical release – to rekindle our passion for newspapering. The film encourages some of that spirit, no doubt, but overall it left me sad. It’s a great movie about the Washington Post’s decision to publish highlights of the Top Secret Pentagon Papers in 1971, very much a welcome addition to the pantheon of journalism movies, but Steven Spielberg’s entry feels curiously out of time more so than, say, 2015’s “Spotlight.”

Continue reading “‘The Post’ fondly recalls the old days of a respected press, war protests (Movie review)”