It takes time, but the ‘High Fidelity’ remix eventually justifies its existence (TV review)

I

n the early going, “High Fidelity” (February, Hulu) so precisely re-creates several iconic scenes from the 2000 movie that it’s like watching a painful amateur stage production of a classic play. We might as well be rewatching the film or reading Nick Hornby’s 1995 book. But as the 10-episode Season 1 moves forward, it starts to repurpose the familiar scenes in new ways, and it ultimately justifies its existence.

Continue reading “It takes time, but the ‘High Fidelity’ remix eventually justifies its existence (TV review)”

PKD flashback: ‘Voices from the Street’ (2007) (Book review)

V

oices from the Street” (written in 1952, published in 2007) was Philip K. Dick’s last published novel — finally hitting shelves a quarter-century after his death. One might therefore assume it’s a middling curiosity, but it’s actually an outstanding achievement, all the more amazing because Dick wrote it when he was 24, about the same age as his protagonist and stand-in Stuart Hadley. The sprawling character piece is like a more muscular answer to J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye” (1951) — raising the question of why publishers considered it to have no audience at the time — and it also calls to mind modern movies such as “Office Space” (1999) and “The Good Girl” (2002).

Continue reading “PKD flashback: ‘Voices from the Street’ (2007) (Book review)”

Superhero Saturday: ‘Runaways’ Season 1 (2017-18) is kind of silly, but kind of good thanks to loaded cast (TV review)

W

ith an unusually long gap between new Marvel Cinematic Universe releases, I decided to finally check out “Marvel’s Runaways” Season 1 (2017-18, Hulu). Now through three seasons, it’s part of the young-adult wing of the MCU, and I appreciate that it’s more colorful, sunnier (it’s set in Los Angeles, the opposite side of the continent from most MCU goings-on) and more fathomable than the other YA series, Freeform’s recently canceled “Cloak & Dagger.” It also has an amazing cast, but Season 1 has one big problem at its core.

Continue reading “Superhero Saturday: ‘Runaways’ Season 1 (2017-18) is kind of silly, but kind of good thanks to loaded cast (TV review)”

First episode impressions: ‘Roswell, New Mexico’ Season 2 (TV review)

R

oswell, New Mexico” (Mondays, CW) returns with an excellent Season 2 premiere that smoothly reminds us of the threads from the long-ago Season 1 while also moving things forward. “Stay (I Missed You)” is written by showrunner Carina Adly MacKenzie, who continues to tap into the spirit of the original “Roswell” – the small-town haunts, the star-crossed romances, the alien mysteries, the ’90s tunes — while making a show that is often slicker and even better than its forbearer. Even though I love the original series more, I admire the way “RNM” is walking that fine line.

Continue reading “First episode impressions: ‘Roswell, New Mexico’ Season 2 (TV review)”

‘All the Bright Places’ is a refreshingly not-annoying Gen-Z teen romance (Movie review)

A

ll the Bright Places” (February, Netflix) walks a fine line. For some young viewers, it’ll be the best movie they’ve ever seen; for cynical older viewers, it’ll be a cliché-ridden bore fest. For me, it’s pretty much the best Gen-Z teen romance I’ve seen (Elle Fanning and Justice Smith are late-era millennials, but they play younger than their ages). There’s always the fear that modern teens will be off-puttingly self-centered and all-knowing, but I liked Fanning’s Violet and Smith’s Finch, and they are quite cute when going through the cliches.

Continue reading “‘All the Bright Places’ is a refreshingly not-annoying Gen-Z teen romance (Movie review)”

‘Chilling Adventures of Sabrina’ Part 3 is a step backward for the series (TV review)

A

fter the first two parts showed a lot of potential and sometimes were quite fun, “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” Part 3 (January, Netflix) is more of a slog to get through, even though it’s eight episodes instead of the usual 10. Or maybe it’s because of the lower episode count but slightly longer episodes. The writers lean into the “Gilmore Girls” approach of telling as much story as they feel like in one sitting, but “Sabrina” should ideally use the “Buffy” approach with an act-based structure.

Continue reading “‘Chilling Adventures of Sabrina’ Part 3 is a step backward for the series (TV review)”

First episode impressions: ‘Katy Keene’ (TV review)

T

he “Riverdale” empire expands further with its second spinoff, “Kate Keene” (Thursdays, CW), about three gals and a gay dude trying to make it big in New York City in their various careers that just happen to be perfect for dramatic TV portrayals. In the pilot episode, Michael Grassi’s series – based on a title character who debuted in Archie Comics in 1945 – does some good things and some bad things. Your verdict will come down to whether or not “Katy” is your thing.

Continue reading “First episode impressions: ‘Katy Keene’ (TV review)”

Throwback Thursday: ‘High Fidelity’ (2000) is among the all-time top five films about music and love (Movie review)

W

hen it came out, I underrated “High Fidelity” (2000) because it’s not as good as the 1995 novel by Nick Hornby. But like its fellow 2000 love-letter-to-music “Almost Famous,” it now stands as an unassailable classic – if you can accept the intense internal focus of Rob Gordon (John Cusack, also one of the four screenwriters). I can see how Gordon’s obsessive self-analysis could be off-putting to some viewers, especially since Cusack (and presumably Rob) is in his mid-30s — unlike, say, Dawson Leery. If you accept the fourth-wall breaking of a man who refuses to grow up, though, “High Fidelity” is an all-time great movie about romantic love as filtered through the male mind.

Continue reading “Throwback Thursday: ‘High Fidelity’ (2000) is among the all-time top five films about music and love (Movie review)”

‘Marriage Story’ is an affectionate yet realistic look at a divorcing couple (Movie review)

M

arriage Story” (2019, Netflix) is both a stark portrayal of why people should never get married (it costs way too much to get divorced) and a surprisingly good love story considering that we meet these people amid their divorce proceedings. In stage play-like fashion, writer-director Noah Baumbach portrays the daily lives of Charlie (Adam Driver) and Nicole (Scarlett Johansson). While there is one extreme shouting match, the couple is mostly calm and mature; it’s actually the legal process of divorce that gets a viewer’s blood boiling.

Continue reading “‘Marriage Story’ is an affectionate yet realistic look at a divorcing couple (Movie review)”

PKD flashback: ‘The Adjustment Bureau’ (2011) (Movie review)

P

hilip K. Dick fans have become accustomed to his short stories being used as foundations for action movies. So “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011) is a refreshing change of pace: Writer-director George Nolfi uses “The Adjustment Team” (1954) as the foundation for a romantic drama. PKD’s version is little more than an idea – albeit a fascinating one – sketched out in the form of a story: Adjusters nudge people down certain paths in life in order to serve a grand plan.

Continue reading “PKD flashback: ‘The Adjustment Bureau’ (2011) (Movie review)”