‘Like Father’ gets by on the charms of Kristen Bell, Kelsey Grammer (Movie review)

It’s easy to see why “Like Father” went straight to Netflix (the modern equivalent of straight-to-video) rather than getting a theatrical release, but fans of Kristen Bell and/or Kelsey Grammer will still find this light comedy to be mildly charming. The feature-length writing-directing debut from Lauren Miller Rogen, it portrays a workaholic woman, Rachel (Bell), who reconnects with her dad, Harry (Grammer), after being left at the altar by a man who realizes she loves only her job.

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Catching up with ‘Slasher’ Season 2 (2017) (TV review)

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Frustrated with “Scream” Season 3 being delayed indefinitely, I was excited to stumble across “Slasher” Season 2 (2017) on Netflix. Chiller’s Season 1 was strong, but Season 2 of Aaron Martin’s Canadian horror mystery series is better. It is gorier, with remarkably creative kill scenes, but it’s also a more compelling mystery that allows us to feel for – or be creeped out by — a lot of the characters.

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Marvel Cinematic Universe flashback: All 13 episodes of ‘Luke Cage’ Season 1 (2016), ranked (TV review)

For the third time, the Marvel Cinematic Universe gives a starring role to a superpowered New York City vigilante with “Luke Cage” Season 1 (2016, Netflix). Showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker, whose credits include “Almost Human” and the upcoming “Creed II,” brings a slightly different sensibility to the genre by name-dropping bits of Harlem history, music and art and showcasing live music at the club that serves as the main setting.

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Marvel Cinematic Universe flashback: All 13 episodes of ‘Jessica Jones’ Season 1 (2015), ranked (TV review)

Krysten Ritter – adorably quirky on “Veronica Mars,” “Gilmore Girls” and “Don’t Trust the B—- in Apt. 23” – shows the exact opposite side of her acting range in “Jessica Jones” Season 1 (2015, Netflix) as the titular self-loathing detective. This season doesn’t venture too far from fellow Netflix Marvel Cinematic Universe show “Daredevil”: It’s in Hell’s Kitchen, and it’s about someone with a tragic childhood and superpowers trying to stop a powerful evil man.

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Marvel Cinematic Universe flashback: All 13 episodes of ‘Daredevil’ Season 1 (2015), ranked (TV review)

In retrospect, I was destined to be a huge “Daredevil” fan before finally getting around to watching Season 1 (2015, Netflix) of this Marvel Cinematic Universe series. Frank Miller’s 1980s comics that redefined Daredevil into a grim vigilante heavily influenced Eastman & Laird’s invention of one of my favorite comics: “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.” Splinter comes from Stick, the Foot comes from the Hand, and the same ooze that gives Daredevil his heightened senses mutates the Turtles.

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‘Everything Sucks!’ mostly gets 1996 right, definitely gets the pain of first love right (TV review)

“Everything Sucks!” (Netflix), the first season of which includes 10 half-hour episodes, starts off like a second-rate “Freaks and Geeks” but eventually strikes painfully accurate notes about first love and high school crushes. By the time the strains of Spacehog’s “In the Meantime” play over the closing credits of episode 10, the show has learned to lean into its dramatic rather than comedic beats, and I was won over. (It’s still inferior to “F&G” – which I am now inspired to rewatch — but everything is.)

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‘Veronica’ adds grit and grimness (and subtitles) to the slick Ouija board subgenre of horror (Movie review)

A bizarrely specific subgenre of horror has gotten a lot of play in recent years: Ouija-board horror. The two films officially sanctioned by the Warner Brothers board game – the bland “Ouija” (2104) and its much better prequel, “Ouija: Origin of Evil” (2016) – are the most well-known. But stories of terror being summoned via a supernatural-themed game date back to 1986’s “Witchboard,” and a quick IMDb search reveals at least 20 movies with “Ouija” in the title, several of which we have all noticed (but probably not actually watched) while lazily scrolling through our Netflix queue.

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Mockumentary ‘American Vandal’ is also a gripping mystery with spot-on performances (TV review)

“American Vandal” – an eight-episode fictional docu-mystery that dropped last fall on Netflix – explores the snicker-worthy case of someone spray-painting penises on 27 cars. And to be sure, creators Dan Perrault and Tony Yacenda intend the straight-faced talk about “dicks” and “ball hairs” and “mushroom heads” to appeal to our inner juvenile comedian.

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‘Cloverfield Paradox’ pays lip service to science, turns into a familiar space thriller (Movie review)

“The Cloverfield Paradox” (which recently debuted on Netflix), the third installment of the loosely connected Cloververse saga, takes topical physics such as the recently discovered God Particle and the popular multiverse theory and smashes them into a movie that has little to do with science. Let’s just say it’s not going to pass muster with Neil deGrasse Tyson or Michio Kaku. But while the space station crew’s paranoia amid a series of disasters is familiar, there’s still fun to be had here if you’re in the mood (and if you already have Netflix, you saved money on a movie ticket this time around).

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Ricky Gervais’ old ‘Office’ humor still lands in ‘Life on the Road’ (Movie review)

Following up on BBC’s “The Office” – which aired back in “Two Thousand and cough-cough” (actually 2001-03) – Ricky Gervais finds there’s still plenty of room to pound the joke into the ground in “David Brent: Life on the Road” (released last year in the U.K., and now available on Netflix). Although there are some viewers who feel the punchline already landed in “The Office,” I enjoy a joke being stretched out till it becomes funny again, and that’s what happens in “Life on the Road,” which impressively adds more layers … well, to the one layer.

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