‘Everything Sucks!’ mostly gets 1996 right, definitely gets the pain of first love right (TV review)

“Everything Sucks!” (Netflix), the first season of which includes 10 half-hour episodes, starts off like a second-rate “Freaks and Geeks” but eventually strikes painfully accurate notes about first love and high school crushes. By the time the strains of Spacehog’s “In the Meantime” play over the closing credits of episode 10, the show has learned to lean into its dramatic rather than comedic beats, and I was won over. (It’s still inferior to “F&G” – which I am now inspired to rewatch — but everything is.)

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‘Veronica’ adds grit and grimness (and subtitles) to the slick Ouija board subgenre of horror (Movie review)

A bizarrely specific subgenre of horror has gotten a lot of play in recent years: Ouija-board horror. The two films officially sanctioned by the Warner Brothers board game – the bland “Ouija” (2104) and its much better prequel, “Ouija: Origin of Evil” (2016) – are the most well-known. But stories of terror being summoned via a supernatural-themed game date back to 1986’s “Witchboard,” and a quick IMDb search reveals at least 20 movies with “Ouija” in the title, several of which we have all noticed (but probably not actually watched) while lazily scrolling through our Netflix queue.

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Mockumentary ‘American Vandal’ is also a gripping mystery with spot-on performances (TV review)

“American Vandal” – an eight-episode fictional docu-mystery that dropped last fall on Netflix – explores the snicker-worthy case of someone spray-painting penises on 27 cars. And to be sure, creators Dan Perrault and Tony Yacenda intend the straight-faced talk about “dicks” and “ball hairs” and “mushroom heads” to appeal to our inner juvenile comedian.

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‘Cloverfield Paradox’ pays lip service to science, turns into a familiar space thriller (Movie review)

“The Cloverfield Paradox” (which recently debuted on Netflix), the third installment of the loosely connected Cloververse saga, takes topical physics such as the recently discovered God Particle and the popular multiverse theory and smashes them into a movie that has little to do with science. Let’s just say it’s not going to pass muster with Neil deGrasse Tyson or Michio Kaku. But while the space station crew’s paranoia amid a series of disasters is familiar, there’s still fun to be had here if you’re in the mood (and if you already have Netflix, you saved money on a movie ticket this time around).

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Ricky Gervais’ old ‘Office’ humor still lands in ‘Life on the Road’ (Movie review)

Following up on BBC’s “The Office” – which aired back in “Two Thousand and cough-cough” (actually 2001-03) – Ricky Gervais finds there’s still plenty of room to pound the joke into the ground in “David Brent: Life on the Road” (released last year in the U.K., and now available on Netflix). Although there are some viewers who feel the punchline already landed in “The Office,” I enjoy a joke being stretched out till it becomes funny again, and that’s what happens in “Life on the Road,” which impressively adds more layers … well, to the one layer.

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Catching up with ‘The Fall’ (TV review)

When I started watching “The Fall” (2013-present, Netflix) I could hardly remember the names of the characters at the end of each episode. It was just The Killer (Jamie Dornan) and The Cop (Gillian Anderson). The early hook was watching The Killer – soon to be known as the Belfast Strangler — get away with breaking into women’s houses and sneaking out, and later sneaking in again and strangling them to death.

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‘A Year in the Life’ puts beautiful bow on ‘Gilmore Girls’ saga (TV review)

Amy Sherman-Palladino and Daniel Palladino warmly invite fans back into Lorelai and Rory’s world in “Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life,” four 90-minute episodes that hit Netflix last week. I had always been satisfied with the seven seasons of “Gilmore Girls” (the cancellation of “Bunheads” after one season left a much bigger void), but by the end of these six hours, I realized that this bow was indeed needed to tie up the saga in a more perfect way.

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Catching up with ‘Stranger Things’ Season 1 (TV review)

The 1980s nostalgia is strong with the 2016 Netflix series “Stranger Things.” The eight-episode first season, which came out in July and rates a staggering 9.0 on IMDB, takes a lot of things we loved about Eighties movies – particularly in the coming-of-age and horror genres – and molds them into what is essentially a six-hour movie that can be enjoyed in two or three sittings.

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‘Star Wars: The Clone Wars’ goes out on an incomplete, but high, note with ‘Lost Missions’ and story reels (TV review)

While I and most fans will always be irked that “The Clone Wars” wasn’t allowed to bring its character threads to natural conclusions, I have to admit that “The Clone Wars: The Lost Missions”(2014), released in March on Netflix and now available on DVD, hits on several crucial elements and bows out with a beautiful grace note in its final episode, providing a nice framing mechanism with the first Season 1 episode, which likewise featured Yoda.

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