Sleuthing Sunday: ‘The Tuesday Club Murders’ by Agatha Christie (1932) (Book review)

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n “The Tuesday Club Murders” (also known as “The Thirteen Problems,” 1932), Agatha Christie gives Miss Marple a collection of short stories to match – and surpass, actually – “Poirot Investigates.” I like this collection better, and I think it’s because it flows smoothly from story to story, with six people sitting around Jane Marple’s house in St. Mary Mead – at the invitation of her nephew, Raymond West – sharing mysteries from their own life experiences that the others must attempt to solve.

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Nora and Corrie amusingly team up again in Preston and Child’s enchanting ‘Scorpion’s Tail’ (Book review)

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orrie Swanson and Nora Kelly, our two favorite women from the Preston-Childverse (with apologies to Constance Greene) return for their second combined adventure, “The Scorpion’s Tail” (January, hardcover). As was first seen in 2019’s “Old Bones,” young FBI agent-in-training Corrie and experienced archaeologist Nora play off each other in entertaining ways.

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Sleuthing Sunday: ‘13 at Dinner’ by Agatha Christie (1933) (Book review)

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3 at Dinner” (1933) is vintage Agatha Christie, featuring one of those clever solutions that in retrospect makes perfect sense, standing as one of her best early character works, and showcasing classic Poirot-Hastings conversations (with the latter serving as the book’s narrator) as they work out of their shared London flat/office.

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Hannibal at 40: ‘Red Dragon’ (2002) lacks ‘Manhunter’s’ style, but does everything else better (Movie review)

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o mark the 40th anniversary of author Thomas Harris’ invention of Hannibal Lecter and the 30th anniversary of “The Silence of the Lambs” – the only horror film to win Best Picture – we’re looking back at the four books and five films of the Hannibal Lecter series over nine Frightening Fridays. Next up is the fourth film, “Red Dragon” (2002):

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Sleuthing Sunday: ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ (1974) is mostly faithful, with dashes of comedy and reflection (Movie review)

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lbert Finney looks the part of Hercule Poirot in his only turn as the Belgian detective extraordinaire in the 1974 adaptation of Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Orient Express.” But he also runs through the hallway of the titular train at one point, anxious to pursue the next step in his investigation; running seems so undignified for the great sleuth. It’s one of several things that are just a little bit off in this mostly faithful adaptation from director Sidney Lumet and writer Paul Dehn (“Beneath the Planet of the Apes”).

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Hannibal at 40: New Starling-Lecter pairing in ‘Hannibal’ (2001) can’t recapture the magic (Movie review)

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o mark the 40th anniversary of author Thomas Harris’ invention of Hannibal Lecter and the 30th anniversary of “The Silence of the Lambs” – the only horror film to win Best Picture – we’re looking back at the four books and five films of the Hannibal Lecter series over nine Frightening Fridays. Next up is the third film, “Hannibal” (2001):

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Preston & Child flashback: ‘Deep Storm’ by Lincoln Child (2007) (Book review)

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n “Deep Storm” (2007), Lincoln Child dives into some of the biggest science fiction ideas of his career without letting the story become untethered. While this, his third solo novel, ultimately hews closely enough to James Cameron’s film masterpiece “The Abyss” (1989) that I can’t say it’s entirely original, Child’s structure is masterful. He builds mysteries atop one another from the first page to the last, and each one plants a fresh hook.

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First episode impressions: ‘Clarice’ (TV review)

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dding both cachet and pressure, “Clarice” (Thursdays, CBS) has the weight of “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991) behind it as it chronicles Special Agent Starling’s 10-year period between the movie versions of “Lambs” and “Hannibal” (2001). If you watch the first episode, “The Silence is Over,” with a checklist in hand, it checks all the boxes, proving that creators Alex Kurtzman (recent “Star Trek” projects) and Jenny Lumet know those films and author Thomas Harris’ source material.

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Sleuthing Sunday: ‘The Secret Adversary’ by Agatha Christie (1922) (Book review)

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gatha Christie’s second novel, “The Secret Adversary” (1922), introduces Tommy and Tuppence, best friends since childhood who form The Young Adventurers in their early 20s. Not as prolific or lauded as Poirot (introduced in her first book, “The Mysterious Affair at Styles”), T&T nonetheless have a following, as witnessed by four additional books and two miniseries (both called “Partners in Crime,” and both featuring an adaptation of this first novel). It’s easy to see why: They are a delightful bantering duo, with Tommy focused on facts and Tuppence being more impulsive.

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Hannibal at 40: ‘The Silence of the Lambs’ (1991) threads the needle to Oscar glory (Movie review)

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o mark the 40th anniversary of author Thomas Harris’ invention of Hannibal Lecter and the 30th anniversary of “The Silence of the Lambs” – the only horror film to win Best Picture – we’re looking back at the four books and five films of the Hannibal Lecter series over nine Frightening Fridays. Next up is the second film, “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991):

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