Throwback Thursday: Before she was Captain Marvel, Brie Larson grabbed attention in the much smaller-scale ‘Room’ (2015) (Movie review)

In our Throwback Thursday series, we’re looking back at movies, TV shows, books or comics that are more than a year old and don’t fit with our regular “flashback” features. Maybe we missed it when it was new, or we want to revisit an old favorite. Basically, we’re reviewing old stuff because we feel like it.

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Despite being from her point of view, ‘Summer ’03’ keeps teen’s world at a timid distance (Movie review)

“Summer ’03” (2018) had the misfortune of coming out the same year as “Eighth Grade,” which showed new blood can be wrung from the stone of coming-of-age dramedies. Stacked against other entries in the genre – but especially that one – “Summer ’03” is tame, without a sharp or original perspective. The trappings of a decent film are here, including lead actress Joey King – very much in her “She’ll be a star someday” mode – and nice Georgia cinematography (although the film takes place in Cincinnati for some reason) by Ben Hardwicke.

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Japanese film ‘Shoplifters’ is a heartfelt exploration of a makeshift family (Movie review)

When I throw around the phrase “makeshift family” in reviews, I’m usually talking about tight groups of friends. But the Japanese film “Shoplifters” (2018) shows us a more literal makeshift family. It’s about six societal castoffs who live together in a tiny house owned by the woman they call “Grandma” (Kirin Kiki).

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First episode impressions: ‘This Is Us’ Season 3 (TV review)

My TV-watching buddy Shaune says of “This Is Us”: “Even when it’s happy, it’s sad.” That contradictory statement perfectly sums up TV’s most emotionally draining show, which is up to its usual tricks in this week’s Season 3 premiere, “Nine Bucks.” Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) and Rebecca (Mandy Moore) sit in his car after a horrible first date in 1972, but Rebecca is won over because of the way he looks at her. It’s the definition of a happy romantic scene.

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This year’s ‘Tully’ isn’t the first great film to go by that name (Movie review)

The Diablo Cody/Jason Reitman “Tully” – now available for home viewing – eventually won me over by being a quality film, but I was initially peeved that it uses the same title as one of the best pictures of 2002. But on the other hand, maybe this new “Tully” will draw fresh attention to the original “Tully,” which has become a forgotten gem in part because it was never a major release to begin with and in part because a lot of its talent didn’t attain the spotlight they should have.

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‘Like Father’ gets by on the charms of Kristen Bell, Kelsey Grammer (Movie review)

It’s easy to see why “Like Father” went straight to Netflix (the modern equivalent of straight-to-video) rather than getting a theatrical release, but fans of Kristen Bell and/or Kelsey Grammer will still find this light comedy to be mildly charming. The feature-length writing-directing debut from Lauren Miller Rogen, it portrays a workaholic woman, Rachel (Bell), who reconnects with her dad, Harry (Grammer), after being left at the altar by a man who realizes she loves only her job.

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‘Tully’ an engrossing film about … sleep deprivation … I think (Movie review)

From “Juno” (2008) to “Young Adult” (2011) to this year’s “Tully,” writer Diablo Cody – with Jason Reitman directing – has put together a spiritual trilogy of films about transitional periods in life, and they are always jarring. Juno is a teenager who is about to have a baby, Mavis is an adult who clings to her youth at the expense of everything else, and in “Tully” (now available for home viewing), Marlo is a mom who is exhausted from raising her three children.

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‘Eighth Grade’ goes inside the heart and mind of an outsider many of us can relate to (Movie review)

Ah, a tale of a kid who feels like an outsider. It’s not exactly untapped territory for a movie, yet comedian Bo Burnham, in his assured debut as a writer-director, approaches this material with tones and angles that haven’t been put together quite like this before. In “Eighth Grade,” Burnham writes from the heart about his own experiences as an eighth-grader, but the character emerged on the page as a girl, Kayla Day (Elsie Fisher, who has a tremendous career ahead of her), and in present day.

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First episode impressions: ‘Life Sentence’ (TV review)

“Life Sentence” (9 p.m. Eastern Wednesdays, CW) is notable for being a rare CW show not based on comic books or the supernatural, and unfortunately it’s also notable for being really bad. You’d think there’d be something special about it if the network is willing to push aside its DC superheroes for a whole hour, but the premiere episode plays like one of those unaired pilots you’d come across on YouTube and then say “Ah, so that’s why it wasn’t picked up.”

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