Superhero Saturday: ‘Batman: Mask of the Phantasm’ (1993) reveals Bruce Wayne’s tragic lost love (Movie review)

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atman: Mask of the Phantasm” (1993), like most animated films based on properties best known for live action, made only a blip at the box office. (See also 2008’s “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” movie.) It was released on Christmas Day 1993 to tide Bat-fans over between 1992’s “Batman Returns” and 1995’s “Batman Forever,” and it’s regarded by many as being better than all of the 1990s live-action entries.

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‘Terminator’ flashback: ‘Salvation: The Machinima Series’ (2009) (DVD review)

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ven fairly serious “Terminator” fans might not know about this oddity: There was a prequel movie to “Salvation” – sort of. “Terminator Salvation: The Machinima Series” (2009) is a six-episode web series with video-game animation that functions as a 75-minute movie. Thankfully, it’s not like watching someone play a video game. It’s driven by Resistance pilot Blair Williams (voiced by Moon Bloodgood) and hacker Laz Howard, a.k.a. Ghost (voiced by Cam Clarke), who can disrupt communications signals with a secret code.

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Hilarious Florida roast aside, ‘Big Mouth’ takes a step backward with hit-and-miss Season 3 (TV review)

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lthough “Big Mouth” Season 3 (October, Netflix) ultimately delivers enough good episodes that I give it a soft recommend, it is a clear step back from its first two seasons. In the worst episodes, the writers get so caught up in their timely messages about sexual identity, dress codes and objectification of women that they forget to make those episodes funny.

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PKD flashback: ‘A Scanner Darkly’ (2006) is the most faithful Dick adaptation (Movie review)

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riter-director Richard Linklater lovingly adapts “A Scanner Darkly” – Philip K. Dick’s 1977 classic about drug use and the drug war set amid a future drug-producing spy state – but the 2006 film is also an example of how movies can play flatter than the novel even when faithfully translated. The film is also notable for using interpolated rotoscoping, in which live-action frames are given an animated look, a technique also used in this fall’s Amazon Prime TV series “Undone.”

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Throwback Thursday: ‘The Animatrix’ (2003) beautifully fills in gaps of the ‘Matrix’ mythology (Video review)

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eleased between the two sequels in the summer of 2003, “The Animatrix” – a 100-minute DVD collection of animated shorts – fills in some gaps and gives us a fuller picture of the “Matrix” mythology. The storytelling is sharp, some written by the Wachowskis or based on a story by them, and the animation is consistently beautiful while running a gamut of styles. It’s not for fans strictly into the kung-fu fights or the main characters (who only make cameo appearances), but it’s a treasure trove for those who want new angles into the material and fewer gaps in the narrative.

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‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ loses something in 2D home viewing (Movie review)

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pider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” (2018) is a typical, solid animated kids’ movie about teenager Miles Morales (Shameik Moore) learning how to be Spider-Man, but on my home viewing I got the sense that it’s mostly supposed to be a visual spectacle. Many action sequences are tailored to theatrical 3D, and some frames look like when you remove your 3D glasses and peek at the screen. My Cold Bananas colleague Shaune tells me this isn’t lazy 2D conversion, but rather a mimicking of old-school comic-book printing, with colors bleeding together. I might’ve enjoyed the visuals more with that perspective.

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‘Big Mouth’ is the next iteration of Things You Can Do on Television – and it’s also darn funny (TV review)

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etflix’s “Big Mouth” – which recently released its second season — marks the latest sea change in Things You Can Do on Television, as it chronicles 12- and 13-year-olds entering puberty. But unlike “The Simpsons” in the 1990s and “Family Guy” in the 2000s, there has been little hand-wringing from parents’ TV groups about “Big Mouth,” which opens with episodes where Andrew (John Mulaney) ejaculates in his drawers at a school dance and Jessi (Jessi Klein) has her first period on a field trip while wearing white shorts. Fortunately for its creators, “Big Mouth” also exists in the most prolific age of TV history: There’s so much out there that watchdog groups can’t keep up.

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‘Valerian and Laureline’ flashback: ‘Time Jam’ episodes 31-40 (2008) (TV review)

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n its final 10 episodes, “Valerian and Laureline: Time Jam” wraps up by riffing heavily on the “Star Wars” prequels, but it stands as its own thing thanks to its trademark bevy of wild ideas – many involving time travel, as the series fully embraces its title. And as had been telegraphed in the sitcom-esque bickering flirtation (or flirtatious bickering?) heading into the closing credits of many episodes, the saga’s final statement is about Valerian’s and Laureline’s relationship … although it’s not exactly what I hoped for.

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‘Valerian and Laureline’ flashback: ‘Time Jam’ episodes 21-30 (2008) (TV review)

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he “Time Jam: Valerian & Laureline” writers finally give us the cute romantic sequence they had been so obviously holding back from us in the 30th episode, “Get With the Times,” and darn if it isn’t almost tear-jerking. Laureline must stay on a planet and press a button after Valerian takes off in their ship; they can’t both depart.

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‘Valerian and Laureline’ flashback: ‘Time Jam’ episodes 11-20 (2007) (TV review)

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hether it’s because I’m more used to the show’s rhythms or because the scripts are getting better, I enjoyed episodes 11-20 more than the first 10 episodes of “Time Jam: Valerian & Laureline.” These aren’t the comics’ Valerian and Laureline, who love each other and don’t make a big deal about it. These versions of V&L are melodramatic; every time a second male is in the story, we get a love triangle because of Valerian’s itchy-trigger-finger jealousy.

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