Throwback Thursday: Hornby’s ‘Funny Girl’ (2014) zeroes in on 1960s British TV, but has appeal beyond that (Book review)

In our Throwback Thursday series, we’re looking back at movies, TV shows, books or comics that are more than a year old and don’t fit with our regular “flashback” features. Maybe we missed it when it was new, or we want to revisit an old favorite. Basically, we’re reviewing old stuff because we feel like it.

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John’s top 10 movies of 2018

The dominant genre of 2018 continued to be superheroes; even with the “X-Men” Universe and DC Extended Universe releasing only one film each, the three Marvel Cinematic Universe movies were impossible to overlook. Still, this was a less blockbustery year than 2017, and by year’s end I had seen at least one really good film in every genre. From a throwback thriller to an arthouse gem, here are my 10 favorite films of 2018.

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‘Juliet, Naked’ a pitch-perfect adaptation of Hornby’s novel about love, regret and music nerdery (Movie review)

Just as I was thinking that 2018 has been a down year for comedies, along comes “Juliet, Naked,” which got a limited release in theaters and is now on home video. It’s the sixth Nick Hornby book to be adapted for the screen, and my personal favorite. (And no, I’m not forgetting “High Fidelity” and “About a Boy.”) Featuring the pitch-perfect cast of Rose Byrne, Ethan Hawke and Chris O’Dowd, it left me misty-eyed with laughter and sadness – sometimes within the same scene – and features a funny yet sober examination of extreme music nerdery.

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First episode impressions: ‘About a Boy’ (TV review)

Although I’m a big fan of the Nick Hornby novel and the Hugh Grant movie, when I heard that “About a Boy” (8 p.m. Central Tuesdays on NBC) was being made into a TV series, I wasn’t all that excited. It seemed like the book and the movie effectively told the full story of how a cool 30-something and an uncool 11-year-old boy helped each other find what was missing in their lives.

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Folds/Hornby collaboration Lonely Avenue a compelling but mediocre experiment (Music review)

Author Nick Hornby writes the words and musician Ben Folds puts the music to them. The September album “Lonely Avenue” is, on the surface, hard to resist. It features one of my favorite authors and the man responsible for what I think is a perfect album, 2001’s “Rockin’ the Suburbs.” And I can’t think of a previous example of a musician and novelist teaming up for an album (let me know if there are any), so they get points for an original gimmick.

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In ‘Juliet, Naked,’ Nick Hornby lays bare the funny side of music snobbery (Book review)

Nick Hornby taps into a gold mine of insider humor in “Juliet, Naked” by making fun of extreme levels of music snobbery. Hornby invents a cult-favorite 1980s musician named Tucker Crowe and provides so much analytical detail about this made-up musician’s songs that I almost wanted to google Crowe to make sure he wasn’t a real person.

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