‘Harry Potter’ at the movies: ‘Sorcerer’s Stone’ (2001)

It’s been 17 years since the cinematic birth of “Harry Potter,” meaning the film series is now old enough to do something Harry, Ron and Hermione never did – graduate from Hogwarts! To celebrate this saga of nine films and counting – with a 10th (“Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald”) coming this year — let’s take a look back at what’s come so far. (And if you’d like to follow along, a marathon starts at 9 a.m. Jan. 1 on HBO, and the films are also available via HBO Go.) We start, naturally, with “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001):

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‘Harry Potter’ at 20: A look back at ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’ (2016) (Book review)

(For the 20th anniversary of “Harry Potter,” I’m looking back at the books and films of J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World saga.)

2007’s “Deathly Hallows” remains the most recent novel J.K. Rowling has penned in the Wizarding World, but she has expanded the saga since with Pottermore.com writings, the “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” screenplay and the stage play “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”(2016). The latter represents the most generous she has been in opening her sandbox for others to play in: Jack Thorne wrote the script based on a story by Rowling, Thorne himself and John Tiffany, who directed the U.K. premiere of the play (which will debut on Broadway in September).

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‘Harry Potter’ at 20: A look back at ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows’ (2007) (Book review)

(For the 20th anniversary of “Harry Potter,” I’m looking back at the books and films of J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World saga.)

The seventh and final book in J.K. Rowling’s boy wizard saga, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” (2007), is the one I most underrated on my first read. Perhaps it plays better with the first six books fresh in a reader’s mind, rather than as a detached experience two years removed from the prior entry. In almost every way, “Deathly Hallows” is different from the first six novels – notably by not following the school-days structure – but the jarring changes are ultimately what makes it a great work of literature, even as it asks more of a reader.

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